It’s Baby Time!

Here at the Chintimini Wildlife Center, our staff and volunteers both look forward to and brace for BABY SEASON! Of course nursing orphaned animals and reuniting them with their parents has its rewards, not to mention the cuteness factor, but the sheer volume of animals can be very time consuming and is sometimes overwhelming. For example, some newborn songbirds need to be fed every 15 minutes from sun up to sun down! All in all though, it simply is the best and most interesting time of year at the clinic.

This March we have already gotten a taste of many of the tiny patients to come. Let’s take the time, while we have it, to introduce the first of the little ones.

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Great Horned Owl nestling before being returned to its nest

The very first baby birds of the season are not so little. This past week we received a call about a Great Horned Owl nestling that was on the ground under a tree. Apparently a recent rain and wind storm had caused it to fall out of its nest. The caring property owners who had called had noticed the parents feeding him on the ground and heard their calls.

Animal Care Director Kelsey Lance went to rescue the nestling and found it was too young to  be out of the nest. He was brought back to the clinic, where staff warmed it up, gave him an exam and found that there were no injuries. He was deemed healthy with a full belly of food, which indicated that his parents had fed him recently.

Continue reading “It’s Baby Time!”

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Sign Up for April Wildlife Camps

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Join the Chintimini Wildlife Rangers youth programs this April!

Day Camps

Amphibians April 14th 9 am to 4 pm/ pre/post care available upon request.

Chintimini is home to three types of frogs, the long-toed salamander, and the rough-skinned newt. Campers will enjoy a day of exploration, crafts and game!

Sign-Up Here

After School Program

Zany Zoology every Thursday starting April 14th to June 9th

Why can’t I see owls in the tree? How many babies can a garter snake have? How do rough-skinned newts protect their eggs? Why can mammals walk in the snow and still keep warm? We will find the answer to these and many other questions as we learn how zoology helps us to better understand how animals survive.

Sign-Up Here

Earth Day Happy Hour Fundraiser

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Raise a pint to Chintimini Wildlife Center!
Join Two Towns Cider & The – Campus – Downward Dog for an Earth Day Happy Hour Fundraiser for CWC
Bring your friends and enjoy: $3 Cider Pints, DJ, Prizes, Swag!!!
Date: Friday, April 22, 2016
Time: 4-7pm
Location: The Downward Dog Campus
2305 NW Monroe Ave
10% of bar will be donated to Chintimini Wildlife Center, which will then be matched by Two Towns Cider

Bobcat Update: Excellent Follow-Up + Outback Move

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The bobcat getting used to her new outdoor enclosure after a visit to the vet.

First, thanks so much for the incredible support and donations to our Bobcat Recovery Fund. As you know Chintimini Wildlife Center receives no government funding, so every donation goes a long way.

We were able to use the funds to cover the bobcat’s post surgery follow-up examination. After being hit by a car and suffering from a broken femur, she underwent a very successful surgery by our partners at the OSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital. She has been putting weight on her leg and otherwise acting like a normal feisty bobcat. But before we could move her to an outdoor enclosure in the outback, Jennifer J. Warnock, DVM, PhD wanted to make sure she was healing well enough to make the transition.  Continue reading “Bobcat Update: Excellent Follow-Up + Outback Move”

Our 100th Patient Sustains a Very Common and Avoidable Injury

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Our 100th patient is a robin who was attacked by a cat.

Like all of our patient admissions, they usually begin with a compassionate human dropping off a box with a sick or orphaned critter inside. For common birds and mammals, most people can accurately identify the species. In the case of our 100th patient, the rescuer had brought us an injured robin. Luckily he knew the bird’s story; it was attacked by a cat. Continue reading “Our 100th Patient Sustains a Very Common and Avoidable Injury”

Save the Date: Art is Wild

Screen Shot 2016-03-23 at 11.12.50 AMYou’re invited to Art is Wild, Chintimini’s Annual Art Show Fundraiser + Auction!

Opening Reception: 7:00pm, May 20, 2016 (silent auction ends 9pm)

Location: CH2M HILL Alumni Center (Address: CH2M HILL Alumni Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331)

Come INTO THE WILD to celebrate and support Chintimini Wildlife Center. It will be a night you won’t forget!

A complimentary drink and delicacies from Forks and Corks will be served and a cash bar will be available.

Meet live education birds and Chintimini volunteers. Enjoy extraordinary wildlife and nature inspired art. Win silent & live auctions as well as raffle prizes. Celebrate the people, wildlife and surroundings of our Willamette Valley.

RSVP on Facebook

Buy Tickets

Thanks to local artist Earl Newman for creating the event poster.

Owl Spotted in Corvallis, Danger of Rodenticide Poisoning

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Great Horned Owl

In Corvallis’ Jana neighborhood, an owl was heard hooting by residents and was recently seen by a Chintimini volunteer. As she was walking on Tyler Ave around dusk a large owl swooped off of a low branch in front of a home and flew up to a taller tree. It was a beautiful sight to behold and a reminder that we must take care of our local wildlife. Due to its unbelievably fast and completely silent flight, the owl was not identifiable, but from its vocalizations it is believed to be a Great Horned Owl. Listen to a Great Horned Owl sound here.

Great Horned Owls eat a variety of rodents, making them perfect pest control agents. But in both urban and rural areas, people use harmful rodenticides, not understanding the potential suffering it can cause not only to rodents, but also to other animals that share their environment. While rodenticides kill rodents, they also kill owls and other predators including hawks and bobcats. And without natural predators there will be an even bigger rodent problem. Continue reading “Owl Spotted in Corvallis, Danger of Rodenticide Poisoning”