Willamette Valley Bird Symposium This Saturday (1/30)

https_proxyThis Saturday January 30th, Chintimini’s Raptor Conservation Program (RCP) is participating in the Willamette Valley Bird Symposium, a day-long symposium bringing together professionals, students, and amateurs from the Willamette Valley to celebrate birds. A few of our ambassador birds will be there along with our dedicated handlers to answer questions and talk about the program. Today is the last chance to buy tickets to the event here. We hope to see you there!

Learn all about the event at willamettevalleybirds.org

 

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National Squirrel Appreciation Day 2016

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Orphaned Western Gray Squirrel being cared for at the Chintimini Wildlife Center.

It’s National Squirrel Appreciation Day (NSAD) and baby squirrels are one of the best creatures on this planet. They are tiny, cute, and don’t have the upper teeth needed to bite (unlike their adult counterparts). To celebrate all the squirrels in the world, I’m going to tell you a story about just one; one tiny squirrel that stole my heart.

It was summer and in the 90’s. I received a call from our clinic regarding a possible orphaned Western Gray Squirrel which had been seen earlier that morning in downtown Corvallis. Given a general location, I got in my car and went to check it out. It had already been several hours since the last sighting, so I didn’t have high hopes. Wild animals have a habit of wandering off and not staying in the same place for very long. Continue reading “National Squirrel Appreciation Day 2016”

Art is Wild Open Call

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Art is Wild 2015, Artwork by Ketzia Schoneberg, “Arabian Camel” Limited Edition Giclee Print #2/220, 27×20″,  Ketzia.com 

Arabian Camel Limited edition giclee print # 2/220 Image 23” x 16” and the paper size is 27” x 20”. Ketzia.com

Calling all artists with a special love for wildlife! Art is Wild 2016, an art auction and fundraiser for Chintimini Wildlife Center, is taking place on May 20, 2016. In order to submit artwork, please complete the form below. Thanks in advance for your interest and please share this open call with other artists.

 

Wildlife Stories from 2015

Last year alone, we treated approximately 1,500 patients in our clinic; a new record. It might have been hard to choose, but here are some of our staff and volunteers’ favorites. From eagles to otters, we hope you enjoy these stories from behind the scenes at the Chintimini Wildlife Center as you celebrate the coming of the New Year!

A Patient Owl Never Forget

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This November marked my one year of volunteering at Chintimini Wildlife Center’s Rehabilitation Clinic. Every week since I began, there have been multiple “firsts,” which can’t be said for many organizations. Whether it’s the first time seeing a tiny saw whet owl or a bobcat, or the first time waterproofing the murres, each week I come home with another exciting story. It’s difficult to pick my “favorite” patient of 2015, but one specific animal stands out immediately in my mind. Continue reading “Wildlife Stories from 2015”

Cleaning You Bird Feeder is for the Birds – Literally!

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Pine Siskin in Incubator / Photo by Jen G. Pywell

Over the years, Chintimini Wildlife Center’s Rehabilitation Clinic has admitted enough wildlife patients to be able to predict seasonal trends. For example, during winter migration when coastal weather is rough we expect many grounded grebes. And summertime is always “baby bird season.” Another species we admit in larger than usual numbers during the wintertime, especially this season, is Pine Siskin.

It may be surprising that what ails many of these tiny songbirds may be lurking in backyard bird feeders – a threat that cannot be seen with the naked eye – Salmonella. With proper feeder maintenance however, we can all help to ameliorate these effects. Continue reading “Cleaning You Bird Feeder is for the Birds – Literally!”

Red-tailed Hawk Release Video


The staff & volunteers at Chintimini Wildlife Center wish you a very Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays. Here is a little “stocking stuffer” to add to the joy that we hope you are experiencing today!

After successful rehabilitation, this Red-tailed Hawk was released in Alsea, Oregon on November 21, 2015.

Thanks again for your continued interest and support of Chintimini Wildlife Center.

Grounded Grebes Flood Chintimini

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Western Grebe

The recent stormy weather on the coast has brought an influx of Western Grebes to Chintimini. In the last several days, 10 have been admitted and more are expected to arrive.

Grebes are great swimmers and divers but due to the placement of their feet very far back on their bodies, their ability to walk on land is extremely poor.  And if that isn’t enough of a problem,  they can only take flight from a substantial amount of water by “running” on the surface to get airborne.

This leaves many grebes in danger if they mistakenly land on the ground. For example, when migrating (which they often do at night) if they spot a wet parking lot or a roadway below, they may land on the pavement thinking the surface is a lake or river. Because they cannot walk or fly, they become ‘grounded.’ Continue reading “Grounded Grebes Flood Chintimini”