Glue Trapped

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Photo Credit: The Humane Society of The United States

Glue traps are a common, yet inhumane tool for trapping unwanted “guests” who’ve made their homes in undesirable places. Many people choose this method because of its low cost and ease of use, however glue traps remain to be indiscriminate and trap unintended victims such as bats, birds, snakes, and even pets. Any animal attracted by the bait can become ensnared.

Guest writer and CWC Shift Leader Claudia Benfield writes about her experience with glue traps:

My neighbor called me in an emergency the other night.  They had left a garage door open and a small bird had flown in.  They called me to get it for them.  They had thought that maybe it had flown back out.  I searched again just to make sure.  When I looked up way high on top of one of their cabinets, I saw a small figure struggling.  They were having a lot of problems with rats and had put large glue traps on top of the cabinets in an effort to solve one problem and not cause another.  But this was not going to be the case after all…

My heart just sunk when I saw that a small finch had his entire body on that glue trap.

I immediately grabbed it and when I examined it, I saw that his little face was stuck on it.  I pried his face off and propped it on a stick that would keep it off until I could get him some help.  I didn’t want to pry the rest of his body off in fear that I would do more damage than good.  So off I went in a mad rush into the night, feeling and wanting so much to have a siren to give me a clear and quick path to the clinic.  And don’t you know, this was the night of the big storm that was being predicted.  When I was driving I could see it was getting worse out there and people were slowing down. That always happens doesn’t it? As I drove down the road with the finch on my lap, in a silent car with no radio on to keep the bird’s stress level down, I could feel his struggle to break free whenever I made a turn.  It made me want to rush even more and I just wanted to save him more and more.  Seeing the manner in which he was glued on the trap, I really had little hope for him.

When I finally got to the clinic and halfway parked my car, I ran in and there were three girls waiting for me from the Thursday PM shift.  I just asked them for help and they jumped right in to help.  I told them what the animal care director had told me to do and what medicine would get him off the glue.  They just took over which at this point I was very thankful for.  By this time, I felt like he was a family member that I had to save.  My heart was racing way too much with worry.  Too many invested emotions for me at this point.  I helped a little but they were just so awesome.  The medicine that can get animals off of glue traps is just a miracle in a bottle too.  We sprayed the liquid on him and he came right off.  When I saw that he was free, I breathed a huge sigh of relief.

It was all so amazing.  He still looked rough and had some bruises under his wing but it seemed that he might be able to recover.  Every time that I am convinced that there is no hope for the one that I am saving, it has been the opposite.  Thankfully life always seems to make a fool out of me.  In that case, I can take that any day.  I am now hopeful that maybe my finch may just have another chance.  I am glad that I can hope for another miracle.
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Photo Credit:The Wildlife Center of Virginia

Unfortunately, this is not an isolated case. This is an all-too-common scenario that we as wildlife rehabilitators encounter over and over. But you can help.

What should you do if you find an animal stuck to a glue trap?

  • First, contact your local wildlife rehabilitator! If you need help finding one in your area, check out this state-by-state listing:

How To Find A Wildlife Rehabilitator

  • If you are unable to find immediate help, use caution when handling the animal and only attempt if you are comfortable with the following procedure recommended by The Humane Society:

What Should I Do If I Find An Animal Stuck To A Glue Trap?

  • Lastly, please do not purchase or use glue traps! For more humane ways of approaching wildlife control see this and this.
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Photo Credit: The Wildlife Center of Virginia

 

 

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It’s Baby Time!

Here at the Chintimini Wildlife Center, our staff and volunteers both look forward to and brace for BABY SEASON! Of course nursing orphaned animals and reuniting them with their parents has its rewards, not to mention the cuteness factor, but the sheer volume of animals can be very time consuming and is sometimes overwhelming. For example, some newborn songbirds need to be fed every 15 minutes from sun up to sun down! All in all though, it simply is the best and most interesting time of year at the clinic.

This March we have already gotten a taste of many of the tiny patients to come. Let’s take the time, while we have it, to introduce the first of the little ones.

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Great Horned Owl nestling before being returned to its nest

The very first baby birds of the season are not so little. This past week we received a call about a Great Horned Owl nestling that was on the ground under a tree. Apparently a recent rain and wind storm had caused it to fall out of its nest. The caring property owners who had called had noticed the parents feeding him on the ground and heard their calls.

Animal Care Director Kelsey Lance went to rescue the nestling and found it was too young to  be out of the nest. He was brought back to the clinic, where staff warmed it up, gave him an exam and found that there were no injuries. He was deemed healthy with a full belly of food, which indicated that his parents had fed him recently.

Continue reading “It’s Baby Time!”

Bobcat Update: Excellent Follow-Up + Outback Move

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The bobcat getting used to her new outdoor enclosure after a visit to the vet.

First, thanks so much for the incredible support and donations to our Bobcat Recovery Fund. As you know Chintimini Wildlife Center receives no government funding, so every donation goes a long way.

We were able to use the funds to cover the bobcat’s post surgery follow-up examination. After being hit by a car and suffering from a broken femur, she underwent a very successful surgery by our partners at the OSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital. She has been putting weight on her leg and otherwise acting like a normal feisty bobcat. But before we could move her to an outdoor enclosure in the outback, Jennifer J. Warnock, DVM, PhD wanted to make sure she was healing well enough to make the transition.  Continue reading “Bobcat Update: Excellent Follow-Up + Outback Move”

Our 100th Patient Sustains a Very Common and Avoidable Injury

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Our 100th patient is a robin who was attacked by a cat.

Like all of our patient admissions, they usually begin with a compassionate human dropping off a box with a sick or orphaned critter inside. For common birds and mammals, most people can accurately identify the species. In the case of our 100th patient, the rescuer had brought us an injured robin. Luckily he knew the bird’s story; it was attacked by a cat. Continue reading “Our 100th Patient Sustains a Very Common and Avoidable Injury”

Owl Spotted in Corvallis, Danger of Rodenticide Poisoning

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Great Horned Owl

In Corvallis’ Jana neighborhood, an owl was heard hooting by residents and was recently seen by a Chintimini volunteer. As she was walking on Tyler Ave around dusk a large owl swooped off of a low branch in front of a home and flew up to a taller tree. It was a beautiful sight to behold and a reminder that we must take care of our local wildlife. Due to its unbelievably fast and completely silent flight, the owl was not identifiable, but from its vocalizations it is believed to be a Great Horned Owl. Listen to a Great Horned Owl sound here.

Great Horned Owls eat a variety of rodents, making them perfect pest control agents. But in both urban and rural areas, people use harmful rodenticides, not understanding the potential suffering it can cause not only to rodents, but also to other animals that share their environment. While rodenticides kill rodents, they also kill owls and other predators including hawks and bobcats. And without natural predators there will be an even bigger rodent problem. Continue reading “Owl Spotted in Corvallis, Danger of Rodenticide Poisoning”

OSU Vet School Performs Surgery on Bobcat

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Chintimini recently admitted an injured Bobcat who was likely struck by a vehicle and suffered a fractured femur. Our partners at OSU Veterinary School performed orthopedic surgery on the wild cat and inserted a plate held together by screws that will remain permanently inside the animal’s bone. Continue reading “OSU Vet School Performs Surgery on Bobcat”

National Squirrel Appreciation Day 2016

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Orphaned Western Gray Squirrel being cared for at the Chintimini Wildlife Center.

It’s National Squirrel Appreciation Day (NSAD) and baby squirrels are one of the best creatures on this planet. They are tiny, cute, and don’t have the upper teeth needed to bite (unlike their adult counterparts). To celebrate all the squirrels in the world, I’m going to tell you a story about just one; one tiny squirrel that stole my heart.

It was summer and in the 90’s. I received a call from our clinic regarding a possible orphaned Western Gray Squirrel which had been seen earlier that morning in downtown Corvallis. Given a general location, I got in my car and went to check it out. It had already been several hours since the last sighting, so I didn’t have high hopes. Wild animals have a habit of wandering off and not staying in the same place for very long. Continue reading “National Squirrel Appreciation Day 2016”